Enhance Your Photography: Look Into the Smaller “Landscapes”

 

My personal work includes a lot of landscape shooting, and I usually try to take in a large swath of territory. I often like the grand vistas, the sweeping plains and looming mountains. In urban landscapes I might include wide-angle shots of buildings crowded together, along with bustling streets and milling people. But sometimes it’s the things at my feet that intrigue me too. Here’s a few images from a trip to Bodie, California, a 100+ year-old ghost town built around a gold and silver mine.

These were originally shot in digital color and converted to black and white.

These images are all from the machinery used to extract the gold and silver from the rock ore.

_MG_5783 stamps copy

 

_MG_5773 nuts copy

_MG_5779 detail copy v copy

Back From Photo Plus Expo….

Had a heck of a great time at Photo Plus – got some new developments coming from a leading software company and a camera company, and finally found some web authoring services/software that are very promising. Saw quite a few friends and made some new ones!

I was very pleased with the response to my presentations on “Screen to Print Match”, sponsored by Datacolor and hosted by Midwest Photo Exchange. Inspires me to update some of my existing content on this subject, and create some new material.

Last, my article on “Creating Custom Folios for Self-Promotion and Presentation” was just published in Photo Technique magazine. Great reviews so far!

Thoughts go out to all affected by the storm, and wishes for a speedy recovery and a return to normalcy!

Images, Autumn 2012, Eastern Sierra

a couple of images from Eastern Sierra, late September 2012…..

 

Aspens near Lundy Lake © David Saffir 2012

 

“The Lost City” – Mono Lake at Sunset

 

Free Webinar: Color Management for Fine Art Reproduction Sept 12

Join us for a webinar on Color Management for Fine Art Reproduction

Fine Art Reproduction is a great business opportunity for photographers. Photographers can photograph flat artwork, and provide true-to-life prints for their customers’ sales, exhibitions, promotional activities, and more. Prints can be made on a variety of fine-art media that are colorfast, archival, and can last up to 200 years. In the digital age, prints can be created in almost any quantity: single print, on demand and large quantities.

On Wednesday, September 12th from 3 pm – 4:15 pm EDT, join us as Datacolor Color Management Experts, David Tobie and David Saffir discuss color management techniques, review photographic methodology, demonstrate printing on fine-art media, and provide marketing tips for recruiting artists in your area. An interactive Q&A will take place throughout the webinar to answer any questions you may have.

One lucky webinar guest will win a free Spyder4PRO!

Register Now! https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/260744370

New Photos From the Palouse Workshop by David Saffir

A sampling of images taken during my latest workshop with Jack Lien…

Colors of the Palouse © David Saffir

 

Rolling Farmlands © David Saffir

HammerHead Barn © David Saffir

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Come to our new Master Class on Digital Printing – more info here.

New Master Class: Fine Art Digital Printmaking

Master Class: Fine Art Digital Printmaking
Instructor: David Saffir, July 15, Inkjet Paper Plus, Carlsbad, CA

“The Palouse” © D Saffir 2012

This is a full-day intermediate- to advanced-level one-day intensive class, intended for aspiring pros and professionals alike. Medium- and Wide-format printing will be the focus of this class. We will have the Epson 3880 and 9800 printers on hand, plus pro-level color management gear from Datacolor.

Contact me for more info or registration, or call 1-888-884-0144

If you pre-reg by July 5, fee is $245 incl lab fees. After that, $295

Thanks to Canson, Hahnemuhle, Digital2You for their support!

Selected Hints and Tips – Fine Art Printmaking for Print Competition

Selected Hints and Tips – Fine Art Printmaking for Print Competition

Sounds obvious, but only use your very best images. Test some of your better prints with friends and colleagues.

When you do this, watch for reactions. Which images create that “wow” response? tell a story effectively? show a subject in a new or unique way?

Composition – keep the “rule of thirds” in mind, and create a print that really provides focus on the main subject. Unneeded objects in foreground/background can ruin your score, as can distracting bright areas or intrusive shadows.

Generally, prints made on luster, pearl, or glossy paper show better in a competition environment. Fine art and “watercolor” papers tend to wash out under the bright lights used by judges.

Make sure that your colors, highlights, shadows, textures, and the like are presented as you want them to be. In general, you’ll want to see at least some detail in highlights and shadows, colors should be smooth, realistic, and show detail where appropriate, etc. Make sure uniform colors, such as skies, are free of digital artifacts like banding.

Make your prints a little darker overall than usual – again, we’re working with very bright lights.

Think about presentation – prints should be mounted on firm, flat stock, no irregularities, bumps, ripples, orange peel, and the like. Watch for color or saturation changes after mounting; although this rarely happens, mounting at high temps can ruin a great print.

If you use an outside printmaker, provide a digital file that is edited and ready to print. Use Adobe 98 RGB or ProPhoto RGB color if printing on inkjet, and usually sRGB if you are using an outside lab (ask them). Take care with your pixel dimensions – a 16z20 print can be 4800 x 6000 pixels at 300ppi. Ask your printmaker about image preparation.

Good luck!

© D Saffir

Click here for details of our upcoming Palouse Photo Tour, June 2012!